CS Students Win 2005 Howard Hughes Award
 
Stan Luban
Ei Ei Phyu
Yen Hock Tan

 

Stan Luban, Ei Ei Phyu and Yen Hock Tan have been awarded a 2005 Summer Howard Hughes Undergraduate Research Internship! All three Computer Science students will work under the direction of Professor Daisuke Kihara. The internship carries a $3000 stipend for the 10 week period, plus $300 for other allowable expenses related to their internship.

Stan Luban is a senior, majoring in Computer Science and Genetic Biology, and has always been fascinated by computation. After working at the Department of Human Genetics at the University of Chicago during the summer of 2002, he became interested in computational biology and its applications. Stan is particularly attracted to biology's potential to augment human bodily function. He began his ongoing research, Comparative Study of Small RNA and Small Peptides in Complete Genome Sequences, involving small RNA and small peptides with Dr. Daisuke Kihara in the autumn of 2003. After completing his majors in December of 2005, Stan Luban hopes to enter a Computational Biology graduate program.

Ei Ei Phyu is a senior with a double major in Math and CS. Under the direction of Dr. Hatasa and Dr. Kihara, she is actively working to develop an interactive application which enhances the learning of foreign languages. Ei Ei's summer project with Dr. Daisuke Kihara is Structure-Basis for Protein-Protein Interaction. The goal of this research is to elucidate patterns of the 3D structure motifs involved in protein-protein interactions. Ei Ei is from Burma (Myanmar). She worked as an intern at the United Nations (Vienna) to redesign the website of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL). After graduation, she plans to pursue graduate studies in information security.

Yen Hock Tan is a junior in the Computer Science Honors program minoring in Management. His current research, Improvement of Protein Sequence Allignments for Better Protein Structure Prediction, aims to obtain better parameters and variants of dynamic programming (DP). Yen Hock began his research efforts with Professor Kihara in summer 2004 as a Research Assistant. He has received semester honors every semester since spring 2003, and made the Dean's list in the spring 2003 & spring 2004. After graduation, Yen Hock plans to join the industry for a few years, and then pursue graduate school.

Congratulations to Stan Luban, Ei Ei Phyu and Yen Hock Tan!